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Plattsburgh author prints second edition of “Heart of a Horse”

Katherine Call-Morin, pictured here with Charlie, a Canadian sport horse, wrote “Heart of a Horse” to inspire others to be compassionate toward animals.

Katherine Call-Morin, pictured here with Charlie, a Canadian sport horse, wrote “Heart of a Horse” to inspire others to be compassionate toward animals. Photo by Shaun Kittle.

PLATTSBURGH — Katherine Call-Morin has always been a writer.

But it wasn’t until last year that she published her first book, a children’s story called “Heart of a Horse.”

“I’m one of those closet writers,” Call-Morin said. “I’ve written many, many children’s stories, and I’ve written adult short stories too.”

Last spring, she self-published 250 copies of her book through Living Water publishers in Vermont.

Call-Morin, who lives in Plattsburgh, said “Heart of a Horse” has sold well, so she recently had 150 more copies printed.

She isn’t solely responsible for the finished product, though—it was illustrated by Canadian artist Pat Bliss.

“I did a Google search for horse artists, and his name came up,” call-Morin said. “I believe in serendipity, so I knew I had to go with him.”

The serendipitous moment came with the connection that one of the real-life horses that inspired the first part of the book, Bliss, shared a name with the artist.

Call-Morin contacted Bliss—the illustrator, not the horse—and asked if he’d do the drawings for her book.

She then sent him a rough layout of the book, complete with sketches and notes describing ideas she had for the images, and he responded by sending her 24 drawings.

“The drawings he sent were just wonderful—they really complimented the story,” Call-Morin said.

The tale of two horses includes both the good and the bad aspects of life, and it was inspired by Bliss—the horse, not the illustrator—and her brother, Spirit.

In the story the two foals are born a day apart and go through different owners before finally finding happiness.

And for those readers who don’t know that a “foal” is a young horse, Call-Morin interspersed the text with info-boxes to explain the various equine-related terms used throughout the tale.

“I wrote the story because I’m concerned with animal welfare and abuse,” Katherine Call-Morin said. “I wanted people to understand that owning a horse is not just about putting an animal in the backyard.”

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